European Georgia opposition party calls for joint majoritarian candidates in regions amid UNM withdrawal

  • The leader of the European Georgia opposition party Gigi Ugulava says that joint opposition candidates will have higher chances to win the elections. Photo: Gigi Ugulava’s Facebook page. 

     

Agenda.ge, 27 Jul 2020 - 17:41, Tbilisi,Georgia

The leader of the European Georgia opposition party Gigi Ugulava has urged opposition parties to nominate joint majoritarian candidates in 22 regional constituencies for the upcoming parliamentary elections in October. 

Ugulava stated that the opposition’s unanimity ‘is crucial’ to defeat the current, Georgian Dream leadership in the race, despite the recent decision of the United National Movement opposition party to present individual candidates for the majoritarian elections in the regions. 

The opposition nominated joint candidates for six of eight constituencies in Tbilisi in June. 

However, the opposition was unable to agree upon joint candidates for the remaining, 24 majoritarian constituencies (two in Tbilisi and 22 in the regions). 

We have had long consultations with the UNM on the joint majoritarian candidates in the regions. However, despite many reasons to do so they have decided to present individual candidates. It is their right. It is not a tragedy and we [other opposition parties] should continue consultations for joint candidates,” Ugulava said. 

He stated that the door remains open for the UNM, to join in the consultations if the party changes its mind about the issue of individual candidates. 

The elections in the autumn will be held in a different manner, with 120 MPs elected per the party-list based electoral system and the remaining 30 per the majoritarian electoral model. 

The ruling Georgian Dream party has already  nominated all 30 of its majoritarian candidates for the upcoming elections, both for the eight constituencies of the capital Tbilisi and the regions. 

The ruling party says that  the opposition has ‘zero chances to win the elections.’ 

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